Social Movements 1
February 9, 2017, 1:30-3:00 PM, China Hall

As has happened many times before, “revolutionary” slogans (“change is coming!”) publicly resonate about as much as reactionary war cries (“make our country great again!”)—indeed, they are sometimes contradictorily spouted by one source. Perhaps what distinguishes this age from those before it are late capitalism, unprecedented (dis)integrations and new civil society configurations, and a looming crisis in regional and environmental politics. Contemporary social movements have to navigate through blurring ideological lines, solidarity clashing with sovereignty clashing with regional (economic) integration, and/or the roadblocks to climate justice. This panel examines how social movements are faring, especially in the Third World/Global South. What strategies have they adopted to pursue their aims in trying times?

Josephine Dionisio
Hansley Juliano, Enrico Antonio La Viña, and Jerik Cruz
Ramon Guillermo

Social Movements 2
February 10, 2017, 1:00-2:30 PM, China Hall

As has happened many times before, “revolutionary” slogans (“change is coming!”) publicly resonate about as much as reactionary war cries (“make our country great again!”)—indeed, they are sometimes contradictorily spouted by one source. Perhaps what distinguishes this age from those before it are late capitalism, unprecedented (dis)integrations and new civil society configurations, and a looming crisis in regional and environmental politics. Contemporary social movements have to navigate through blurring ideological lines, solidarity clashing with sovereignty clashing with regional (economic) integration, and/or the roadblocks to climate justice. This panel examines how social movements are faring, especially in the Third World/Global South. What strategies have they adopted to pursue their aims in trying times?

Joel Rocamora
James Tyner
Eduardo Tadem
Bradley Cardozo